FAQ for The Lifecycle Benefits of an Influential Early Childhood Program View Summary

Frequently asked questions regarding the research from Lifecycle Benefits of an Influential Early Childhood Program, ranging from explanation to how the 13% ROI was determined to clarifications around experiment criticisms. For reference, the research paper can be found here, and a summary of the research can be read here. 1. Why is the ROI higher?…

Research Summary: The Lifecycle Benefits of an Influential Early Childhood Program View Summary

This two-page summary discusses the key takeaways of Professor Heckman’s latest research, “The Lifecycle Benefits of an Influential Early Childhood Program.” The research shows that high-quality birth-to-five programs for disadvantaged children can deliver a 13% per year return on investment—a rate substantially higher than the 7-10% return previously established for preschool programs serving 3- to…

Early Childhood Education: Research Summary View Summary

This two-page summary document is for those who need to prove that government investment in early childhood education for disadvantaged children pays off for individuals and society. Early Childhood Education is a comprehensive investment of government-subsidized early childhood development programs—including Head Start. Heckman and co-authors Sneha Elango, Jorge Luis García and Andrés Hojman find that…

A Scaffolding of Support: 8 Guiding Principles View Summary

Here are outline eight guiding principles for effective investments in early childhood development that promote positive social and economic outcomes by building a “scaffolding of support” around disadvantaged young children and their families. When Professor Heckman presents his research on the economics of early childhood to policymakers and advocates, one question is often asked: “If…

4 Big Benefits of Investing in Early Childhood Development View Summary

Preventing the achievement gap, improving health outcomes, boosting earnings and providing a high rate of economic return—this one-page document summarizes the benefits of investing in quality early childhood education for disadvantaged children. This document is often shared with policymakers, advocates and the media to make the case for early childhood education. Improving the economy, strengthening…

Research Summary: The Jamaican Study View Summary

Published in the journal Science on May 30, 2014, a study by Professor Heckman, UC Berkeley economist Paul Gertler, and fellow researchers at the University of Chicago, the University of the West Indies, the World Bank and the University of London finds that a high-quality early childhood intervention boosted the earnings of severely disadvantaged children…

The Heckman Equation Brochure View Summary

A simple introduction to Professor Heckman’s work and the power it has to solve some of the most pressing social and economic problems we face. Use this resource at meetings and events to support your argument for the value of investing in early childhood development. 1. Intelligence and social skills are developed at an early…

Research Summary: Abecedarian & Health View Summary

A topline, one-page summary of the North Carolina Abecedarian preschool program analysis that tracks the participant’s education, employment and health outcomes to age 35. Heckman finds significant health benefits beyond education and increased employment, particularly in reducing the incidence of costly chronic diseases such as hypertension, heart disease, diabetes and obesity. This summary makes the…

Research Summary: Perry Preschool and Character Skill Development View Summary

This two-page research summary provides proof that social and emotional development in early childhood development drives better education, health, social and economic outcomes. Heckman highlights the influence that character skills have on school, career and life success, and provides guidance for how advocates and policymakers can use the research to promote effective social and economic change.…

Lacking Character, American Education Fails the Test View Summary

In this three-page brief, Professor Heckman argues that what we value and measure in American education doesn’t measure up to the true drivers of human and social success. Character skills often matter more than cognitive skills and calls for educating the whole child, from early learning through young adulthood. For decades, there has been a…